book love, food, Philippines

Philippine Cookery: From Heart to Platter

To me, Philippine Cookery From Heart to Platter is a cross between a humble coffee table book and an elevated cookbook. The book begins with telling us chef and author Tatung Sarthou’s personal experience and views on food. There is a page that outlines his 5 laws of cooking. Despite the typical nature of rules, these five laws felt more encouraging rather than prescriptive. The contents and recipes that follow are organized not by ingredients but by cooking method. Historical and cultural notes are found in between recipes and instructions.

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filipiniana, Philippines

Unofficial Kathcake

I finally texted my only batchmate in town to watch Barcelona: A Love Untold together! I was super happy that there was someone I could text who didn’t think Pinoy movies were beneath him. Haha. C is a fan of Daniel Padilla while I could say I’m unofficially (coz don’t you need to be in an actual fans club?) Kathryn’s fan. She’s got a lot of anti-fans but my sis and I love her. She’s so cute!

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book love, filipiniana, Philippines, Uncategorized

Indio Bravo: The Life of Jose Rizal

Indio Bravo: The Life of Jose Rizal is written by Asuncion Lopez-Rizal Bantug with Sylvia Mendez Ventura and illustrated by BenCab. It aims to introduce young people to Jose Rizal and provide an intimate narrative about his life. It is published by Tahanan Books for Young Readers. Rizal scholar Ambeth Ocampo, the National Historical Institute, National Centennial Commission, the Spanish and German Embassies of Manila are also credited for their assistance in making the book.

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culture, filipiniana, Philippines

Pagpamalandong Matod sa Pinulongan

Bisaya

Omg. I am embarassed by my poor grasp of my very own language. I can explain. I picked-up and used Bisaya growing up. I use it to communicate with my family, friends and people in general. I did not learn it formally in school nor did I read Bisaya literature so my fluency is practical and conversational. English was what I learned in school. Like most Filipino students, I was exposed to English grammar and literature lessons. If I want to express emotion, I speak in Bisaya. With letters and formalities, English is the language of choice.

Last year, my mom brought a copy of a Bisaya magazine and I could not “read” it. There were too many words that were “deep” or seemed “antiquated” (but they’re not!). I realized that my vocabulary was SUPER limited. I could not believe that I spoke and grew up with a language but could not even appreciate an article or literary piece. Even this blog entry is in English. So I have taken up the challenge of expanding my Bisaya vocabulary with the help of Bisaya magazine and blogs that publish Visayan poems.

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post note:

For a better idea about dialects and languages, listen to this podcast episode (Aug 6 2019) which mainly says that “The difference between a language and a dialect is mostly meaningless and entirely political.”

https://slate.com/podcasts/lexicon-valley/2019/08/john-mcwhorter-on-language-versus-dialect

During the time of writing the below paragraph, my understanding of the differences between dialect and languages was simplistic, based on what info I was exposed. I was also conflicted of the idea that if dialects were varieties of language so would they not be the same thing? Like…Bisaya is a dialect but it is also a language.

Anyway, I’m pretty happy about learning from this podcast and sharing it with you!

“What’s a language? What’s a dialect? Really it’s about how people speak in relatively small communities from place to place and it varies a bit as you move along from place to place. That’s what language is really like” -John H. McWhorter

Also here’s a bit of insightful Reddit convo:

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Philippine Languages

I once had a bet with my unknowing boss who said Tagalog was our language and the rest are dialects. I insisted we had 8 major languages and he vehemently disagreed. Of course I only bet when I’m sure. His was a common mistake.

Most people think of Philippine languages, that are not Tagalog, as dialects. Dialect is a variation of a language. Bisaya, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Pangasinense, Kampampangan, Ilocano are not variations of Tagalog. Always, I want to correct that mistake but don’t bother. Let me satisfy that itch:

The Philippines is an archipelagic country with diverse languages. We have 8 major languages: Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Waray, Pangasinense, Ilocano, Bikol and Kapampangan. Major only because these are spoken by huge chunks of the population. We actually have more than eight languages.

Those 8 languages are not mutually intelligible. I will not understand my grandfather if he speaks to me in Pangasinense. He will not understand my Bisaya either. Those are two different languages.

If I speak in Kagay-anon with someone who is from Bohol, we will be able to understand and have a conversation despite differences in pronunciation or a few terms because these are dialects of Bisaya. Just like a Batangueno will understand a Caviteno if they converse in their own dialect of the Tagalog language.

In the end, I won the bet and got myself a free bottle of wine.

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book love, filipiniana, Philippines

Book Love: Sky Blue After The Rain

Sky Blue After The Rain

I have little patience in so many things even in one I usually love to do: reading.

However, with some books, you are immediately grabbed by the story. I find myself having fun or feeling sad depending on how they go. I enjoy Cristina Pantoja Hidalgo’s writing. I love reading stories set in different places but there’s nothing like reading Philippine literature.

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